CJP is proud to announce the 2020 Chai in the Hub honorees!
These 12 young adults are doing amazing things personally and professionally
to better Greater Boston’s Jewish community.

Nominated by their peers, friends, and colleagues, this group of under-40ers is shaking up the scene
with style. You can meet them in person on Saturday, February 8, at the Royal Sonesta Boston.
For now, check out their bios below!

Samuel Andler


Please tell us your pronouns: he/him/his

Occupation: Packaging Sales (fourth generation family business), Andler Packaging Group

Describe your career in one sentence:
I'm a jack of all trades, but the company is a wholesale distributor of primary rigid packaging: glass and plastic bottles and jars, caps, lids, and labels.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Most weekends during the winter I volunteer as a ski instructor for people living with disabilities. I find this work incredibly rewarding!

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Combined Jewish Philanthropies
    • Ben-Gurion Society, Co-chair
    • Next Generation Family Business Committee
    • Campaign Cabinet
    • 2018 Young Adult Mission to Spain and Israel, Co-chair
  • Chabad of the North Shore
  • Tobin Bridge Chabad
  • Israel Bonds

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
No Gandhi or Mother Theresa quotes here. I simply learned from my parents at a young age the value of community and the need to do good. It's a privilege to be a part of the Greater Boston Jewish community, and frankly it’s a privilege to be on this planet, so it kind of feels like our responsibility to help it be as supportive, inclusive, and accessible as possible.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
Ten years is a long time. As my uncle would say, "If I'm here, God willing," I'll be transitioning from the young adult programming at CJP and most likely tackling larger and broader topics. I hope to leave the young adult realm with a lasting legacy, and stronger than when I first started work with CJP. This will be tough as it’s been a great community for me.

To answer the question though, as I see the adults in my life start to age, I've already grown more interested in the underserved aging population. As I hope to start a family, I'm sure Jewish education will also become a priority. One of my favorite CJP staffers uses the line, "Give until it feels good." I try to give both money and time to a point that it feels good. This won't change, but maybe in 10 years my priorities will.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
While it doesn't tie in with where I see my work going in the next ten years, something I feel we can tackle together in the near term is the rise of antisemitism and the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement. I know they're different, but they're often conflated and both stem from a place of hate and ignorance. It is scary to live through a time with antisemitism on the rise like we've seen in the past decade.

Nadav David


Please tell us your pronouns: he/him/his

Occupation: Financial coach, Compass Working Capital and community organizer, primarily at Kavod

Describe your career in one sentence:
I support families in reaching financial goals, and build power in communities through grassroots organizing. I create a more equitable city through centering racial and economic justice in my work every day.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
I love music, both making playlists and singing songs at Shabbat meals, along with playing and watching basketball.

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Kavod, Co-leader of Jews of Color, Indigenous Jews, Sephardim, and Mizrahim (JOCISM) caucus and Partnerships Chair
  • Boston Foundation Neighborhood Fellows Program
  • Tzedek Lab
  • Boston Ujima Project
  • Muslim Justice League

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
I’m moved by the resilience and resistance of many generations in my own diverse family, from Iraq to Poland and beyond, and of Jewish and non-Jewish communities throughout the U.S. and around the world. These legacies move me to believe in and strive for a better future for all people and communities, realizing that both our struggles and our dignity are tied up in one another.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
In the next 10 years, I hope to see Jewish communities and organizations continue to engage with the meaningful and difficult task of shifting resources and power to Jews who have at times been made invisible and pushed out from our communities (such as Jews of Color, Sephardim, and Mizrahim; transgender Jews; Jews with disabilities; poor and working-class Jews). My hope is that my work of pursuing justice in partnership with many Jewish communities and organizations will be even more powerful and representative of the multiplicity of the identities and experiences in our communities.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
For the last two years, I have been a part of developing safety and security strategies for Jewish communities, centering the needs of all of our members — especially those of us who are most impacted by the presence of armed security and law enforcement (e.g. Jews of Color, Jews with disabilities, transgender Jews). These conversations about safety and security are top of mind for so many of our Jewish communities due to the white nationalist violence that has targeted our community among others. I would love to be working with our Jewish community to think about how we can lean into our relationships with non-Jewish partner organizations to support us in staying safe and remaining committed to our values of supporting the needs of all of our members.

Caroline Dorn


Please tell us your pronouns: she/her/hers

Occupation: Membership and Engagement Coordinator, Temple Shalom of Newton

Describe your career in one sentence:
I use creativity and connection to build community and craft intentional relationships to people and institutions.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Comedy, trying new restaurants, and anything artistic!

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Temple Shalom of Newton
  • Riverway Project (Leadership Team Member)
  • Union for Reform Judaism (2018-2019 JewV'Nation Audacious Hospitality Fellow)
  • JDC Entwine
  • Camp Tel Noar Alumni

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
Boston provides endless opportunities for Jewish connection and engagement. Our community is full of intelligent, inspired leaders who are generous with their time and push beyond the boundaries of what we understand Jewish life to mean. I'm inspired by the growth of relevant, meaningful Judaism that belongs to all — and by the idea that the best resource in our Jewish community is our relationships. The most exciting part of what I do is getting to meet people — in bars, at synagogues, and everywhere in between. Every new connection I make is a gift towards the type of community I hope to be a part of.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
We are facing a dramatic shift in the direction of our Jewish institutions. In order to remain relevant, all communities must continue to set the bar high for accessibility and inclusion. In the next 10 years, I see myself continuing to place emphasis on network weaving and relationship building as the central pillar of our Jewish communities. As our communities evolve, we should remember that our strongest and most stable resource is our connection to one another, and I see myself using creativity and intentionality to build on the connections I've made in my time in Boston.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
I'd like to see our collective Jewish community commit wholeheartedly to global justice work — particularly anti-racism work and understanding implicit bias. As we continue to balance sustaining our Jewish institutions and meeting the needs of our constituents, I hope we can approach the evolving needs of our community with wide lenses, open hearts, and the guidance of our faith tradition.

Rabbi Uri Feldman


Occupation: Principal/Head of School, Yeshiva Ohr Yisrael

Describe your career in one sentence:
Educating the next generation of Jewish men to be knowledgeable in all areas and passionate about their faith and tradition.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Studying Torah.

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Yeshiva Ohr Yisrael
  • Kollel of Greater Boston
  • Khal Tiferes Yosef
  • Torah Academy

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
Seeing the impact of a strong Jewish education on the Jewish family and community inspires me to spread education to as many children as possible.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
Further expanding Yeshiva Ohr Yisrael’s reach throughout the community and sharing that with other Jewish communities.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
I would love to see more communal learning opportunities. Torah study has bound the Jewish people together for millennia, and I believe that its study will continue to unite us.

Pamela Friedman


Please tell us your pronouns: she/her/hers

Occupation: Client Relationship Manager, Liberty Mutual Insurance Global Retail Markets

Describe your career in one sentence:
I oversee the Real Estate Strategy for Liberty Mutual Insurance Global Retail Markets in the northeast of the U.S.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
I love musical theatre — both as an audience member and performing on stage.

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Combined Jewish Philanthropies
    • Chai Society, Co-chair
    • Outreach & Engagement Committee, past Co-chair
    • LEADS, past Co-chair
    • Birthright Israel staffer
    • Dewey Stone Kadimah Leadership Program, past participant
    • israel360 Israel in Depth, past participant
  • The Chai Center
  • Hebrew College, Me’ah Select and Eser
  • AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee)
  • CAMERA (Committee For Accuracy in Middle East Reporting and Analysis)
  • Fuel for Truth Bootcamp
  • CoreNet Global, New England chapter
  • A Better City, Emerging Leaders Program
  • Local community theatre

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
Ensuring those looking for their Boston Jewish community find what they are looking for, in whatever way they want to connect! Additionally, I am always inspired to learn from Jews living in Israel and the diaspora. Whenever I get the opportunity to travel, I always make a point of checking out the Jewish community to learn about the history and community there today. I find it incredibly inspiring that when Shabbat comes around each week, people all around the world share in the connection. This reminder of the bond we share inspires me to create positive change in the community and celebrate that connection.

It is my personal passion to be involved in the Jewish community. I thrive on the notion that we can all work together to do our part and make the world a better place. I also enjoy encouraging others to do their best. If I can be the friend that helps another in a time of need, and they can turn around and make the world a better place because they are happy, that is what I will do. I am constantly inspired by the people I am surrounded by and the great work they are doing; it makes me want to do even more, so I want to pay that forward.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
In the next 10 years, I see myself continuing to step up where I am needed. This hopefully means continuing to explore lay leadership opportunities within CJP as they arise, but also continuing to expand my search for answers to my questions on spirituality, Israel, and how to best position the next generation for success.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
My focus in the Boston Jewish community is really on engagement, but there are always gaps to be filled. For example, I believe there is still work to be done for young adults graduating from local colleges or moving to Boston for their first job out of college. Not having a personal connection within the young adult community is difficult, and there is a lot of value from someone telling you to get involved with particular organization. I propose a program between college Hillels and local Jewish Federations (like CJP) to have a soft handoff where towards the end of college, Hillel matches you up with someone from your new community (like a CJP Community Connector), to help them seamlessly adjust to this new community!

Danielle Goldman


Please tell us your pronouns: she/her/hers

Occupation: Co-founder and Executive Director, Open Avenues Foundation

Describe your career in one sentence:
My foundation is equipping and empowering global immigrants to advance communities and people in the United States.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Hosting parties. It's all about the food spread. I'm a pro charcuterie board assembler.

What organizations are you involved with?
  • 2019/2020 Cohort, WIN (Women Innovating Now) Lab Accelerator, Babson College
  • One Little Light, Board Member
  • Boston Chamber of Commerce, Advisory Board Member
  • BUILD Boston, Mentor
  • Hack.Diversity at The New England Venture Capital Association, Volunteer

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
There are so many individuals in the United States who have incredible amounts of talent to offer society, they just have not been given the opportunities and resources to do so. I get excited about creating new pathways for passionate, driven, and deserving individuals to succeed and drive change for others along the way. Creating connections between all people to understand and see value in each other is so critical to achieve in communities.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
Immigration is part of the United States' ethos and economy. The country is dependent on immigrants coming to the U.S., succeeding here, and contributing to our communities. In the next 10 years, we will build new programs to ensure this population of foreign nationals is able to optimally contribute socially, culturally, and economically to American society. Our immigrant-led programming will create pathways for foreign nationals to demonstrate their commitment and contributions to the U.S., ultimately creating a new narrative about immigrants that highlight the benefits that these individuals bring to the nation.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
It is more important now than ever for the Jewish community to come together and support those who are the target of hateful narratives. All immigrants, from those who cross the southern border to those who come for Ph.D. programs, are building the foundation of our daily lives in unique ways. These individuals have been packaged together into a box, labeled with the term “immigrant,” and used to feed a negative narrative that says we, as a country, do not need these people to succeed. This is alarmingly false and an all too familiar propaganda tactic that the Jewish community must stand up against. Together, we must support, empower, and advance the diverse populations that make America strong. We must reclaim the term “immigrant” as one of power, strength, resilience, and unbridled talent.

Leah Goldstein


Please tell us your pronouns: she/her/hers

Occupation: Director, Jewish Teen Foundation of Greater Boston (JTFGB) and Associate Director, Prozdor

Describe your career in one sentence:
I run a Jewish leadership program that educates and empowers teens from the Greater Boston area to develop a life-long commitment to philanthropy, advocacy, and community engagement as they work together and learn the ins and outs of the nonprofit sector.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
I absolutely love to craft.

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Combined Jewish Philanthropies
  • Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Boston
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness
  • Massachusetts Samaritans, Board Member
  • Boston Bridges Fellowship
  • Women in Development
  • The Ruderman Foundation Task Force
  • Gateways: Access to Jewish Education
  • American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
I am inspired by the generation that came before me and the generation that is coming after me. I grew up in a home where giving back came naturally and it was all I knew. My parents and grandparents instilled the important concepts of tzedakah (charitable giving) and tikkun olam (repairing the world) at such a young age. At a certain point, it became obvious that I was going to take those values and put them into action as a professional one day. Between what I've learned from my family and recognizing my own privilege over time, I knew I wanted to find a way to make an impact — and hopefully pay it forward with the next generation. Having the opportunity to work closely with teens and teach them these same Jewish values that I learned at a young age is so special. I love being able to watch them grow as they develop a passion for change and eventually go off on their own to make a difference in one way or another.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
10 years ago, I would never have imagined that I would be living in Boston and running this amazing program that didn't even exist yet... so it's difficult to think about the next 10 years. I do know that I want JTFGB to continue to grow so that hundreds of more teens can continue to become exposed to strategic philanthropy, activism, leadership skills, raise millions of dollars, and so much more. I also want this program to be truly inclusive and accessible to all. This work is ever-evolving and we are constantly trying to do new things, but it's exciting and I am so proud and fortunate to be a part of making it all happen.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
Mental health. We need to come together in the Jewish community — and beyond — to eradicate the stigma surrounding mental health so we can openly talk about it without feeling shame. We need to recognize mental health as something that is real and not pretend it doesn't exist. The more we bring it up, the more we are able to normalize it, the more lives we are going to save. There are already some incredible organizations and foundations within the Jewish community that are doing really important work with this, but there is still so much more to do.

Rabbi Jen Gubitz


Please tell us your pronouns: she/her/hers

Occupation: Rabbi, Temple Israel of Boston

Describe your career in one sentence:
Judaism + Human Condition = intentional conversation, compassionate listening, deep learning, and innovative ways of gathering.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Going to concerts, drinking whiskey, hanging out with my partner Matan and our friends, and a good pun!

What organizations are you involved with?
  • The Riverway Project at Temple Israel of Boston
  • Central Conference of American Rabbis
  • Hebrew Union College, Jewish Institute of Religion
  • Indiana University Jewish Studies Alumni
  • Union for Reform Judaism Goldman Union Camp Institute

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
I'm inspired by Judaism's enduring capacity to root us in wisdom, values, and action that support the fullest expression of our humanity. As the Director of the Riverway Project and a Rabbi at Temple Israel of Boston, I'm passionate about elevating and making accessible Jewish wisdom for everyone in the Jewish orbit to gather, learn, and grow into the best version of themselves, connected one to another, and to the greater Jewish community. In practice, it has been so exciting to lead the Riverway Project as we move from inspiration to impact. We focus on relational connections, immersive learning, and leadership skills training to empower young adults. Our Squad model (Seder Squad and Shabbat Squad) creates opportunities for young adults to be part of a relational cohort and learn new leadership skills, and then we support them to design DIY Jewish experiences that engage their peers.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
Being a rabbi is a vocation, a life, and profession woven together. So as much as I grow and change personally in the next 10 years, so will my professional life. I hope I will be doing work and living a life that demands of me to be a deep listener, caring pastoral guide, innovative prayer leader, dynamic educator, and creative thinker.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
Addressing our implicit bias, internalized racism, and breaking down the many barriers which prevent people from feeling they can bring their whole selves to the Jewish community.

Jessica Solomon Sanders


Please tell us your pronouns: she/her/hers

Occupation: Physician, specializing in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

Describe your career in one sentence:
I am in my final year of residency/fellowship in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, where I train as a neurologist and developmental pediatrician to treat children and adults with a variety of developmental disabilities.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Tandem biking.

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Boston, member of Board of Directors
  • The Riverway Project Leadership Team
  • Waypoint Adventure, member of Board of Directors
  • Yachad of New England (formerly involved in Yachad of Cleveland)
  • Fresh Air Camp
  • Special Olympics Cross Country Skiing, Weston Ski Track
  • American Academy of Neurology
  • Child Neurology Foundation, Transitions Project Advisory Committee
  • American Academy of Developmental Medicine and Dentistry
  • Massachusetts Initiative on Transition to Adult Care for Patients with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, Steering Committee and Chair of Workforce Development Task Force

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
An increasing number of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are living to adulthood in the community; however, programs that serve these individuals have not grown at nearly the rate required to meet the demand and needs of our communities. I am constantly inspired by the incredible impact a person or organization can have when they include people with developmental disabilities in the workplace, outdoor adventures, and social activities. Through my friendship with Julia, my match through the Friend2Friend program with Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Boston, which pairs adults with developmental disabilities in one-to-one friendships with peers in the community, I have witnessed both the struggles of accessing resources as well as the powerful positive impact of inclusion in all aspects of life. I am inspired by my close friends who have developmental disabilities and how they continue to positively influence our community to be inclusive, accepting, and empowering of all.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
I hope to continue to draw from the rich experiences I’ve had with organizations like Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters to truly understand the needs of the community in order to ask the right questions and advance the healthcare profession in ways that can genuinely improve the lives of people with neurodevelopmental disabilities. As a long-standing volunteer with several organizations that not only promote but also sustain inclusion in our Jewish community and beyond, I hope to continually strengthen collaborations between community organizations, families, and the healthcare profession to further understand and improve methods for allowing people with neurodevelopmental disabilities to live their lives to the fullest.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
While our Jewish community has made strides toward improving its inclusion of people of all abilities, there is still a long way to go. My dream is that our Jewish community can become so inclusive with social activities, jobs, and opportunities for economic advancement, that organizations like the Friend2Friend program, Yachad, and the many other groups that work tirelessly to provide opportunities for people with disabilities will no longer be necessary. If people of all abilities are truly embraced in our Jewish community and have meaningful friendships, vocational opportunities, and inclusive community spaces, we can focus everyone’s work on continually improving our communities in extraordinary ways that impact everyone for the better.

Jackie Schon


Please tell us your pronouns: she/her/hers

Occupation: Co-founder, The Paint Bar

Describe your career in one sentence:
I empower creativity.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Being with my family and playing with my one year old!

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Boston Business Women
  • Northeastern Center for Family Business
  • Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Boston

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
It's a privilege to help non-artists overcome their fear of art. By empowering people to have more confidence in their creativity, The Paint Bar is helping them become more innovative thinkers. Also, art is non-political, and therefore it can unify our Jewish community.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
In the next 10 years, I hope to be a thought leader on a national level in the creative space. I hope to inspire others to explore their creativity and realize the powerful impact creativity has to create real and positive changes that are truly innovative.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
I'd like to see the Jewish community tackle acceptance of those different than us on all levels.

Samantha Walsh


Please tell us your pronouns: she/her/hers

Occupation: Regional Director, BBYO New England

Describe your career in one sentence:
I work with Jewish teens to create impactful, fun, and dynamic programs and inspire them to be leaders in their Jewish community.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Snowboarding, reading, and yoga.

What organizations are you involved with?
  • BBYO
  • National Association of Social Workers (NASW)
  • Jewish Family & Children’s Service (JF&CS)

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
I work with some amazing teens who really inspire me to make positive change in the community. I love that my role allows me to support and provide guidance to the teen leaders who create opportunities for BBYO members and non-members alike.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
I'd love to stay an active member of the Jewish community in a professional setting or as a volunteer when the time comes to move from BBYO. Right now, I plan to spend a few more years with BBYO and then move into a more clinical role as an adjustment counselor.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
I would love for us to come together and work towards standing up against antisemitism. In this world, we need to be a strong and cohesive community to ensure we are all safe and comfortable in practicing Judaism.

Efraim Yudewitz


Please tell us your pronouns: he/him/his

Occupation: Camp Director, Camp Tel Noar

Describe your career in one sentence:
I've spent my career building meaningful relationships with families throughout Greater Boston to help them connect to organizations providing inspiring and warm Jewish experiences.

What is your favorite non-work activity?
Time with my wife and two girls, and occasionally playing basketball.

What organizations are you involved with?
  • Camp Yavneh (formerly attended)
  • Prozdor Hebrew High School
  • The ADL Camp IF program
  • Gann Academy
  • The Cohen Camps, specifically Camp Tel Noar

What inspires you to create positive change in the community?
I am deeply inspired by our families and their commitment to creating a caring and supportive community. My job as a member of the professional staff at Camp Tel Noar is to ensure that we provide the most meaningful and longest lasting experience possible. The relationships that I have been fortunate to have and help foster are what makes this work so rewarding and helps Boston to be the special place it is.

How do you see your work evolving in the next 10 years?
The business of camp is evolving at a tremendous pace, the sophistication of programmatic outcomes and arc of stakeholder experiences are pushing us to be even more intentional. We will continue to be passionate about building an organization that can evolve and meet the needs of the ever growing diversity of our community. I hope to see opportunities for camp have a wider impact on our community and partner with other institutions to help community members access the magic of camp.

What’s an issue that you’d like to see our Jewish community tackle together?
Shared human resources for our communal organizations is an area of opportunity for our community. The skills and talents needed to execute our mission and support our stakeholders are becoming increasingly diverse and complicated, and many of our organizations lack the resources to attract the necessary professionals. Additionally, many have reported a lack of volume in the talent pool. Boston is uniquely qualified to address this by identifying synergies, promoting collaboration, and leveraging the strength of our Jewish communal ecosystem to attract more top talent.


Congratulate the Honorees in Person

 

CHAI IN THE HUB

Saturday, February 8, 2020 | 7:30 p.m.
Royal Sonesta Boston
40 Edwin H. Land Boulevard
Cambridge

Register